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How To Treat Golfers Elbow

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Treating Trigger Points in the Wrist Flexors - Golfer's Elbow       Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is a form of tendinitis similar to tennis elbow Golfing is one of many root causes of the condition, which in reality can occur from any activity where there is overuse of the muscles and tendons of the forearm. Whilst the symptoms including pain at the elbow may be similar to tennis elbow, in the case of golfer’s elbow the pain and inflammation are experienced at the inside - medial side - of the joint. The medial epicondyle is a bony prominence on the...

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How To Find Trigger Points - Sternocleidomastoid (SCM)

Posted by Judith Winer on

  Trigger Point Anatomy - Sternocleidomastoid     ActiveTrigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) Can Appear for a Host of Reasons - the Symptoms Can Often be Chronic Pain This Sternocleidomastoid is a long strap muscle with two heads. It is sometimes injured at birth, and may be partly replaced by fibrous tissue that contracts to produce a torticollis (wry neck). A hugely important muscle for trigger point therapists. Generally speaking, the sternocleidomastoid is the muscle that most people feel hurting or tense when performing sit-ups. When short, it changes the position of the head on the neck, resulting in a...

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Hamstrings - Injury Prevention and Recovery

Posted by Judith Winer on

  Hamstrings - Stretching Exercise for Injury Prevention and Recovery      Hamstring stretches should be a common part of your stretching and flexibility routine  Hamstring flexibility is important for all athletes and may help prevent injury and delayed onset muscle soreness, tightness, and trigger point activation, after exercise. Tight hamstrings may also signal themselves early and be felt as even very minor restriction of motion when straightening the knee or in some cases may refer as a cramp at the back of the knee.         Roll over areas of tension using a hard rubber ball    ...

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Levator Ani Syndrome - Trigger Point Therapy Overview

Posted by Judith Winer on

  Pelvic Pain and Levator Ani Syndrome - Dr. Jonathan Kuttner     If you have pelvic pain, chances are you have trigger points somewhere within or adjacent to your pelvic floor muscles The levator ani consists of the pubococcygeus and the iliococcygeus muscles. Together with the coccygeus muscle, these muscles form the pelvic diaphragm (the muscular floor of the pelvis). We find that trigger points in the levator ani muscle are often implicated in low back pain, Levator Ani Syndrome, and a wide range of chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Pelvic Disorders Whilst trigger points may be the primary cause of...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Weak Ankles and Ankle Instability

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Clinical Assessment - What Else Could it Be?     Foot pain, ankle pain, and ankle instability Anyone involved in athletics is particularly susceptible to an ankle sprain - an acute injury to any or all of the ligaments that support the ankle structure. Tearing or stretching of the ligaments can occur when the foot is rolled or twisted forcefully. High-impact sports involving jumping, sprinting or running on changing or uneven surfaces often lead to ankle sprains. Basketball, football, cross country and hockey are a few of the sports commonly associated with ankle sprains. Lateral ankle or inversion sprains...

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