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Trigger Point Therapy - Cervical Spondylosis

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Cervical Spondylosis - Common Trigger Point Treatment Protocols   More than 85 percent of people older than age 60 are affected by cervical spondylosis Cervical spondylosis is also known as arthritis of the neck. It is caused by the degeneration or “wear and tear” of the cervical spine, including the joints between the bones and the discs between the vertebrae of the neck. Abnormal spurs or growths on the edges of the vertebrae called osteophytes may also contribute to this condition. This is all part of the degeneration process that the body goes through as a result of ageing. In many people,...

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CRPS 1 and Frozen Shoulder

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  CRPS 1 / RSD - May get worse if left untreated and can become irreversible   Severe cases of Frozen Shoulder Syndrome can be associated with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 (CRPS 1) - formally known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) or Sudeck’s Atrophy This condition can be a serious and unwelcome complication of frozen shoulder syndrome. In some cases the CRPS 1 may precede the onset of a Frozen Shoulder. The average age of CPRS sufferers is 42, which fits into the “younger” frozen shoulder sufferer profile. The condition is also commonly associated with insomnia, another frozen shoulder...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating the Gluteus Maximus

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

   Treating Gluteus Maximus Trigger Points - Dr. Jonathan Kuttner   Ischemic Compression Technique     Gluteus Maximus The gluteus maximus is the most coarsely fibered and heaviest muscle in the body, forming the bulk of the buttock. The upper fibers laterally rotate the hip joint and may also assist in abduction of that joint. The lower fibers extend and laterally rotate the hip joint (ex. forceful extension, as in running or rising from sitting).  Through its insertion into the IT tract, the gluteus maximus also helps to stabilize the knee in extension.      Gluteus Maximus - Common Trigger Point...

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Trigger Points - Digastricus

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Latin digastricus, having two (muscle) bellies Origin Anterior belly: digastric fossa on inner side of lower border of mandible, near symphysis. Posterior belly: mastoid notch of temporal bone.   a) Posterior, b) Anterior     Insertion Body of hyoid bone via a fascial sling over an intermediate tendon. Action Raises hyoid bone. Depresses and retracts mandible as in opening the mouth. Nerve Anterior belly: mylohyoid nerve, from trigeminal V nerve (mandibular division). Posterior belly: facial (V11) nerve. Trigger Point Referred Pain  Anterior: lower four incisor teeth, tongue, and lip, occasionally to chin. Posterior: strong 2 cm zone around mastoid...

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Shoulder Impingement or a True Frozen Shoulder?

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Shoulder Impingement or a True Frozen Shoulder?     With a frozen shoulder it is very important to keep the shoulder moving as much as possible What you do with your shoulder on a daily basis is important both for managing pain and increasing the rate of recovery. There are simple things you can think about as you go about your daily life to make the ordeal of your frozen shoulder more bearable. The instinct we have when something is hurting is not to use the painful area. Whereas this may be appropriate for other problems, such as a fracture...

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