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Trigger Point Therapy - Quadratus Femoris

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Treating Quadratus Femoris - Stuart Hinds   Trigger Points in the Quadratus Femoris typically appear together  with other Trigger Points in the immediate area, including the hip, and the pelvic floor This small muscle helps to rotate the hip sideways. When the hip is flexed, it helps move the hip and thigh away from midline. The quadratus femoris is one of the short lateral rotator core muscles, which interact with dysfunctions of L4 through S3 vertebrae. Movement is the best indicator as to which lateral rotator is involved. This muscle may stick to the underlying obturator externus.       Quadratus...

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Treating Trigger Points - The Obliques

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  The Obliques - Trigger Points and Symptoms    Trigger Points in the Obliques can be the Cause of Stomach, Chest, Back or Groin Pain The posterior fibers of the external oblique are usually overlapped by the latissimus dorsi, but in some cases there is a space between the two, known as the lumbar triangle, situated just above the iliac crest. The lumbar triangle is a weak point in the abdominal wall.   External Oblique - Common Trigger Point Sites   ORIGIN Lower eight ribs. INSERTION Anterior half of iliac crest, and into an abdominal aponeurosis that terminates in the linea...

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Anterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome (AINS)

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Testing for Median Nerve Entrapments - Stuart Hinds      Anterior interosseous nerve syndrome (AINS) is one of 3 common median nerve entrapment syndromes; the other two being pronator teres and carpal tunnel syndromes Lesions of the anterior interosseous nerve in the forearm are rare and often misdiagnosed as tendon injuries. Wrist pain is the most common feature of AIN lesions regardless of the aetiology; this has been reported in 85% of patients.  Nerve lesions may be due to trauma, microtraumatic injuries, or “neuritis”.  The Anterior Interosseous Nerve (AIN) is an exclusively motor branch of the median nerve. A complete...

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Simple Self Help Tips for Plantar Fasciitis

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Plantar Fasciitis - How To Treat Your Own Trigger Points    The plantar fascia supports the arch of the foot and if strained, becomes weak, swollen and inflamed Plantar Fasciitis is the most frequent injury of the plantar fascia and refers to an inflammation of a thick band of tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot and connects the heel bone to the toes. The plantar fascia supports the arch of the foot and if strained, becomes weak, swollen and inflamed. Repeated strain can bring about small tears in the ligament causing pain and swelling.  Repeated injuries to the plantar fascia seem to be the main...

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What Every Therapist Needs to Know About "Whiplash" (WAD)

Posted by Jane Ziegler on

  Whiplash - An Overview     "The sudden force will often stretch or tear the muscles and tendons of the neck" Whiplash, more correctly known as whiplash associated disorders (WAD) is a term used, fairly loosely, to describe a neck injury where the head is either suddenly jolted backward and then forward, or forward and then backward, in a whip-like movement, or it may be suddenly and forcibly rotated depending on the angle of the neck when the incident occurs. This sudden force can stretch and/or tear the muscles and tendons in the neck. Most commonly this is as a result...

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