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Trigger Point Blog — Trigger Point Classification

Pathophysiology of Trigger Points

Posted by Team NAT on

   Trigger Points - An Overview of the Evidence     Understanding trigger points will change the way you think about pain management Sadly, too many therapists remain out of the loop, when it comes to understanding trigger points. In the case of some, there is still a tremendous cynicism. This is generally because these therapists have received a negatively biased education, and have somehow avoided the opportunities to learn and explore trigger point therapy first hand. For anyone willing to take the time to piece it all together, there is plenty of freely available research to support trigger point therapy....

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What are Super Trigger Points?

Posted by Team NAT on

  Super Trigger Points Explained - Simeon Asher BSc (Ost)   Learn More About Trigger Points    When treated correctly, Super Trigger Points can rapidly release deep-seated and chronic pain There are many theories around super trigger points, and sadly too little research. `The reality according to just about any experienced trigger point therapist is that (1) yes, they do exist, and (2) identifying and treating super trigger points can have fast and profound effects.  Super Trigger Points (STPs) seem to be active all the time - it is like they “have to be there”. They are the myofascial strange attractors. Treating...

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Trigger Point Therapy - What are the different types of trigger point?

Posted by Team NAT on

    Trigger point dry needling workshop for family doctors - Simeon Asher   Not all trigger points are trigger points, and not all trigger points are the same! We really appreciate all the feedback on social media and we try wherever possible to respond to your requests for information in these daily blogs. A lot of therapists seem to be (rightly!) interested in trigger point classification, so today's blog is an updated overview of the commonly accepted classifications. Trigger points are described according to location, tenderness, and chronicity as central (or primary), satellite (or secondary), attachment, diffuse, inactive (or latent), and...

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