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How To Treat Splenius Capitis and Cervicis

Posted by Julian Knight on

  Treating Splenius Trigger Points - Stuart Hinds    The splenius muscles are prone to trigger points - but often overlooked as they can be difficult to reach Technically speaking the splenius capitis and cervicis muscles form part of the deep (or intrinsic) muscles of the back. These are broad strips of muscle that run up the back of the neck, deep to the Sternocleidomastoid (SCM). These back/neck muscles are active as they are work both together and independently to extend the head and neck.  The splenius muscles are very prone to developing trigger points, and these can be the cause of chronic...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Rectus Abdomini

Posted by Judith Winer on

Trigger Point Anatomy - Rectus Abdomini     Trigger points in the rectus abdomini are often associated with lower back pain The rectus abdominis flexes the lumbar spine, depresses the rib cage and stabilizes pelvis during walking.  This is the muscle which is activated while doing so-called "crunches" because it pulls the ribs and the pelvis in, and curves the back.     Rectus Abdominis - Trigger Point Referred Pain Maps   These muscles are also used when a child is delivered, during bowel movements, and coughing.  When this muscle is exercised and layers of fat disappear from the abdomen,...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Multifidus / Rotatores

Posted by Graeme Turofsky on

  Multifidi and Rotatores - Trigger Point Anatomy       Trigger Points in Multifidi may be the cause of a high percentage of back pain, and may increase the chance of back injuries occurring The multifidus muscles help to take pressure off the vertebral discs so that our body weight can be well distributed along the spine. These muscles are a major contributor to neuromuscular efficiency of the “core.” The superficial muscle group keeps our spine straight while the deep muscle group contributes significantly to the stability of our spine. These two groups of multifidus muscles are recruited during many...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Gluteus Maximus

Posted by Graeme Turofsky on

  Gluteus Maximus - Trigger Point Anatomy     Weak gluteal muscles can have wide-reaching implications up and down the kinetic chain The gluteus maximus plays a significant role in stabilizing both the sacroiliac joint and the knee joint. It does so by means of superior fibers, which attach to the aponeurosis of the sacrotuberous ligament, and inferior fibers, which attach anteriorly to the iliotibial band, providing tension down to the knee. Because the gluteus muscles are also called on to support and stabilize our core - they are called into action without our realizing it when we are sitting at...

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Stretching Quadratus Lumborum (QL)

Posted by Graeme Turofsky on

      Quadratus Lumborum - Common Trigger Point Sites   Active Trigger Points in the QL are Often Associated with Back Pain The QL works together with the psoas for creating an anterior pelvic tilt. It also helps to stabilize the lumbar spine together with the transverse abdominis, and to function with the other “core” muscles.  When both sides of the QL contract together, this causes the lumbar spine to go into extension. When only one side contracts, it will either pull the rib cage downward to assist in lateral flexion (side bending) or it will raise one side of the pelvis upward. Also...

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