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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Gluteus Medius and Minimus

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     Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Gluteus Medius (and Minimus)   Gluteus Medius This muscle is mostly deep to and is therefore obscured by the gluteus maximus, but appears on the surface between the gluteus maximus and the TFL. During walking, this muscle, along with the gluteus minimus, prevents the pelvis from dropping toward the non-weight-bearing leg.     The gluteus medius abducts the hip joint. The anterior fibers medially rotate and may assist in flexion, whilst the posterior fibers slightly laterally rotate the hip joint. As with the gluteus maximus, trigger points in the gluteus medius may refer pain locally to...

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Trigger Point Overview - Rectus Abdominis

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  Rectus Abdominis Trigger Points - Dr. Jonathan Kuttner   Latin rectus, straight; abdominis, of the belly/stomach The rectus abdominis is divided by tendinous bands into three or four bellies, each sheathed in aponeurotic fibers from the lateral abdominal muscles. These fibers converge centrally to form the linea alba. Situated anterior to the lower part of the rectus abdominis is a frequently absent muscle called the pyramidalis, which arises from the pubic crest and inserts into the linea alba. It tenses the linea alba, for reasons unknown.   Rectus Abdominis Trigger Points   Origin Pubic crest and symphysis pubis (front...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Understanding and Treating Multifidus

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  Multifidus Trigger Points Explained        Treating Lower Back Pain - Online Course     The role of the multifidus in producing an extension force is essential to the stability of the lumbar spine The multifidus is the most medial of the lumbar back muscles, and its fibers converge near the lumbar spinous processes to an attachment known as the mammillary process. The fibers radiate inferiorly, passing to the transverse processes of the vertebrae that lie two, three, four, and five levels below. Those fibers that extend below the level of the last lumbar vertebra (L5) anchor to the...

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Trigger Point therapy - Lower Back and the Sacroiliac Joint

Posted by Team NAT on

   Treating the Sacroiliac Joint    Treating Lower Back Pain - Online Course   Sacroiliac joint pain is implicated in 15% to 20% of chronic low back complaints In the first part of the 20th century, sacroiliac (SI) joint syndrome was the most common diagnosis for lumbago (low back pain). Pain in the lower back or buttocks, was generally referred to as Sacroiliac Syndrome or SI joint syndrome.  For about half a century (1930's - 1980's) most doctors ignored the sacroiliac in the diagnosis and treatment of low back pain, based on the mistaken view that a joint with so little movement...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Stretching the Erector Spinae Muscles

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  Stretching the Erector Spinae - Dr. Jonathan Kuttner     Trigger Point Therapy Course - Treating Back Pain - Click Image Above for Details     Interestingly and contrary to what some of us have been taught the erector spinae muscles don’t hold the spine erect In fact, it turns out that most fibers are electrically silent during postural work (Kippers 1984). This muscle group is designed to activate during extension from flexion, i.e. standing upright from bending forward.   Erector Spinae - Common Trigger Point Sites   The erector spinae has three divisions each of which may manifest...

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