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Stretching Quadratus Lumborum (QL)

Posted by Judith Winer on

 

 

 

Quadratus Lumborum - Common Trigger Point Sites

 

 

Active Trigger Points in the QL are Often Associated with Back Pain

The QL works together with the psoas for creating an anterior pelvic tilt. It also helps to stabilize the lumbar spine together with the transverse abdominis, and to function with the other “core” muscles. 

When both sides of the QL contract together, this causes the lumbar spine to go into extension. When only one side contracts, it will either pull the rib cage downward to assist in lateral flexion (side bending) or it will raise one side of the pelvis upward.

Also noteworthy about the QL is that it is also used in respiration where it helps to stabilize the lowest rib.

Active trigger points in the QL are often associated with back pain, often as part of a wider "holding pattern" issue.

Here (below) are 3 simple stretches that most people should be able to perform easily and safely:

 

 

Stretching the QL

 

Technique:

• Kneel on all fours
• Lift one hand and reach towards your ankle

• Keep your back parallel to the ground

Primary muscles being stretched

Quadratus lumborum. External and internal obliques.

Secondary muscles being stretched

Iliocostalis lumborum. Intertransversarii. Rotatores. Multifidus.

Injury where stretch may be useful

Lower back muscle strain. Lower back ligament sprain. Abdominal muscle strain (obliques).

Note: Keep your back straight, parallel to the ground, and your thighs in a vertical position. Distribute your weight evenly on both your hands and knees.

Download Free Stretching Guide

 
Quadratus Lumborum Stretching

 

Technique:
Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart and look forward. Keep your body upright and slowly bend to the left or right. Reach down your leg with your hand and do not bend forward.

Primary muscles:
Quadratus lumborum. External and internal obliques.

Secondary muscles:
Iliocostalis lumborum. Intertransversarii. Rotatores. Multifidus.

Injury where stretch may be useful:
Lower back muscle strain. Lower back ligament sprain. Abdominal muscle strain (obliques).

Note: Do not lean forward or backward. It's important to concentrate on keeping your upper body straight.

 

 
Quadratus Lumborum Stretching for Trigger Points

 

Technique:

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, then slowly bend to the side and reach over the top of your head with your hand. Do not bend forward.

Primary muscles:

Quadratus lumborum. External and internal obliques. Latissimus dorsi.


Secondary muscles:

Teres minor. Iliocostalis lumborum. Intertransversarii. Rotatores. Multifidus.

Injury where stretch may be useful:

Lower back muscle strain. Lower back ligament sprain. Abdominal muscle strain (obliques).

Note: Do not lean forward or backward; concentrate on keeping your upper body straight.

Download Free Stretching Guide

 

 

 

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This trigger point therapy blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

 

  

   

 

 

 

 


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