Menu
Cart 0

Stretching for Pain Relief - Erector Spinae

Posted by Judith Winer on

TECHNIQUE

Kneel on the ground and raise one arm. Then rotate your shoulders and middle back while looking upwards.

MUSCLES BEING STRETCHED

Primary muscles: Semispinalis thoracis. Spinalis thoracis. Longissimus thoracis. Iliocostalis thoracis. Iliocostalis lumborum. Multifidus. Rotatores. Intertransversarii. Interspinales.
Secondary muscles: External and internal obliques. Pectoralis major.

ERECTOR SPINAE

The erector spinae muscle can often play a large role in lumbar back pain. It is made up of many small muscles - longissimus thoracis, iliocostalis, multifidi, and rotatores – and runs parallel to the spine.

It is very easy to place too much stress on this muscle by bending over and twisting the body. Carrying heavy objects can also overload the muscle and lead to the formation of trigger points. Interestingly, the smallest movements are sometimes to blame. An example is sitting on your wallet – this tilts your hip and can bend your spine.

If the muscles in the erector spinae are too tight or have trigger points, certain movements might be painful. Trigger point self help techniques or massage therapy, can help release trigger points and alleviate pain.

INJURY WHERE STRETCH MAY BE USEFUL

Back muscle strain. Back ligament sprain. Abdominal muscle strain (obliques).

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR PERFORMING THIS STRETCH CORRECTLY

Keep your arm pointing straight upward and follow your hand with your eyes. This will help to further extend the stretch into your neck.

  

Find a Trigger Point Professional in your area

Recent Blogs and Articles 

Nationally Accredited Home-Study Courses

About NAT Certification

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

This trigger point therapy blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

 

 


Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published.

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out