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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Brachioradialis

Posted by Team NAT on

 

Brachioradialis Trigger Points - Dr. Jonathan Kuttner 

 

VIDEO NOTES

The brachioradialis is part of the superficial group and forms the lateral border of the cubital fossa. It is typical for the belly of the muscle to be prominent when working against resistance.

The brachioradialis muscle works to flex the elbow and to help the extensors of the hand to bend the wrist up and back.

The brachioradialis is commonly over-used and over-worked, especially by those who utilize gripping in their occupation (or gym-rats). Active trigger points are common and will often induce pain that is misdiagnosed as tennis elbow.

ORIGIN

Upper two-thirds of anterior aspect of lateral supracondylar ridge of humerus (i.e. lateral part of shaft of humerus, 5–7.5 cm (2–3”) above elbow joint).

INSERTION

Lower lateral end of radius, just above styloid process.

ACTION

Flexes elbow joint. Assists in pronating and supinating forearm when these movements are resisted.

NERVE

Radial nerve, C5, 6. BASIC FUNCTIONAL

MOVEMENT

Example: turning a corkscrew.

 

 

Brachioradialis Trigger Points

Brachioradialis Trigger Points and Referred Pain Map

 

 

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Lateral epicondyle area 3–4 cm patch with vague arm pain (radius border), localizing into strong pain in dorsum of thumb.

INDICATIONS

Elbow pain, pain in thumb (dorsum), tennis elbow, weakness of grip, RSI.

CAUSES

RSI, prolonged mouse use, racquet sports, poor stretching, playing musical instruments.

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

De Quervain’s tenosynovitis. Osteoarthritis of thumb (trapezium).

CONNECTIONS

Biceps brachiii, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis longus/brevis, supinator, extensor digitorum.

GENERAL ADVICE

Avoid prolonged standing and carrying (heavy bags, suitcases). Take regular breaks when typing. Use wrist supports. Change grip on tennis racquet.

   

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

This trigger point therapy blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

 

  

   


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