Menu
Cart 0

Trigger Points - Tibialis Posterior

Posted by Team NAT on

 

 

Tibialis Anterior Trigger Points - Stuart Hinds

 

Latin "tibia" = "pipe" or "flute"/"shinbone"; "posterior" = "behind"

The tibialis posterior is the deepest muscle on the back of the leg. It helps maintain the arches of the foot.

ORIGIN

Lateral part of posterior surface of tibia. Upper two-thirds of posterior surface of fibula. Most of interosseous membrane.

INSERTION

Tuberosity of navicular. By fibrous expansions to sustentaculum tali, three cuneiforms, cuboid, and bases of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th metatarsals.

ACTION

Inverts foot. Assists in plantar flexion of ankle joint. Antagonist: tibialis anterior.

 

 

Tibialis Posterior Trigger Points

Tibialis Posterior - Common Trigger Point Site

 

 

NERVE

Tibial nerve, L(4), 5, S1. BASIC FUNCTIONAL

MOVEMENT

Examples: standing on tiptoes; pushing down car pedals.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Vague calf pain, with increased intensity along achilles tendon to heel/sole of foot.

 

 

Tibialis Posterior Trigger Point - Typical Pain Pattern

Tibialis Posterior Trigger Point - Typical Pain Pattern

 

 

INDICATIONS

Achilles tendonitis, calf/heel pain, plantar fasciitis, pain running/walking on uneven surface, Morton’s neuroma, foot numbness in patch around metatarsals, toe cramps, hammer/claw toe, tarsal tunnel syndrome.

CAUSES

Arthritic toes, poor footwear (heels) or orthotics, sports (e.g. walking, jogging, running, sprinting), prolonged driving (pedals).

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Shin splints. Posterior tibial compartment syndrome (deep). Tendon rupture. Tenosynovitis. Achilles tendonitis. Deep vein thrombosis. Cardiovascular.

CONNECTIONS

Flexor digitorum longus, peroneal muscles, flexor hallucis longus

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

This trigger point therapy blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

 

  

   

Related Posts


Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published.

Words from our students

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out