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Trigger Point Release - Infraspinatus

Posted by Christopher Hamze on

Muscle Energy Stretching Technique - Infraspinatus

 

The infraspinatus muscle is member of the rotator cuff group, which comprises the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis

The rotator cuff helps hold the head of the humerus in contact with the glenoid cavity (fossa, socket) of the scapula during movements of the shoulder, thus helping to prevent dislocation of the joint.

 

Infraspinatus Trigger Points

 

ORIGIN

Infraspinous fossa of scapula.

INSERTION

Middle facet on greater tubercle of humerus. Capsule of shoulder joint.

ACTION

As a rotator cuff muscle, helps prevent posterior dislocation of shoulder joint. Laterally rotates humerus.

Antagonists: subscapularis, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi.

NERVE

Suprascapular nerve, C(4), 5, 6, from upper trunk of brachial plexus.

BASIC FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT

Example: brushing hair back.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Middle/upper cervical spine: deep anterior shoulder joint zone of
3–4 cm in region of long head of biceps brachii, radiating into biceps belly then into forearm—diffuse symptoms in median nerve distribution.

Medial/scapula: to medial border of scapula.

 

 

Infraspinatus Trigger Point Referred Pain

 

 

INDICATIONS

Decreased range of motion in Apley scratch test (behind back), hemiplegia, rotator cuff tendinopathy, frozen shoulder syndrome, pain in back and front of shoulder, night-time shoulder pain when sleeping on same/ opposite side, dead-arm sensations, pain undoing bra, shoulder girdle fatigue, weakness of grip, loss of arm strength, changes in sweating (usually increased), “mouse arm” from computer mouse overuse.

CAUSES

Overuse activities with arm unsupported (e.g. computer mouse, driving, tennis, weight training, water sports, ski poles), pulling objects behind body, sudden trauma from fall on outstretched arm/ catching yourself when trying to stop a fall, prolonged holding of heavy objects.

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Biceps tendonitis. C5–C6 neuropathy. Suprascapular nerve dysfunction.


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