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Tension Headache - Self Help Tip

Posted by Jane Zielgler on

 

A tension headache is pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck, usually associated with muscle tightness in these areas

Tension headaches are one of the most common forms of headache. These generally occur when neck and scalp muscles become tense, or contract. The muscle contractions can be a response to stress, depression, a head injury, and anxiety. 

Tension headaches are often associated with trigger points in the suboccipital muscles. For those of you that have a partner or friend to work with, here's a simple technique that is usually beneficial whether or not you succeed in hitting the exact spot!

 

 

Technique (you need a partner or friend to help you)

  1. Identify the trigger point by referring to the image above and then slowly use your fingers to feel for a taut band of muscle

  2. Feel for the sweetest tender point in this area

  3. Using delicate fingertip pressure, gently and gradually press on the trigger points, increasing until you feel resistance

  4. This should be a spot within the the muscle that when pressed, produces a "sweet" discomfort rather than pain

  5. Apply sustained pressure, ideally until you feel the trigger point yield and soften. This can take from a few seconds to several minutes

  6. Steps 3 & 4 can be repeated, gradually increasing the pressure until the point has fully yielded

  7. Don't worry if you don't feel the trigger point. Perform the steps above applying gentle pressure to the general area indicated above

 

 

Perform three to four times daily for up to six weeks.

Follow these pressure sessions by gently massaging the area with some oil or lotion together with a good neck stretch.

  

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This trigger point therapy blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 


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