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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Biceps Belly

Posted by Simeon Niel Asher on

 

 

Trigger Points in the biceps are often associated with shoulder, back, and elbow pain.

Most of us think of the biceps as the attractive muscle that flexes the elbow. In fact the biceps is involved in numerous functions including elevation of the arm, turning the palm upward (when flexed), and inward rotation of the shoulder. 

Trigger points in the biceps belly are often associated with pain that manifests in the upper back, elbow, and shoulder. Trigger points form in this muscle for a wide range of reasons including repetitive motion injuries, throwing/sports induced (e.g. basketball, tennis), lifting heavy objects with the palm upward (ex. weight training), musical instrument playing (ex. violin, guitar).

Self help techniques can be quite effective. Try using a hard ball or a pressure tool to massage the area. Stretching between treatments can also help to dissipate trigger points.

Ask your therapist about trigger points!

Do not attempt to perform these trigger point therapy techniques unless they fall within your professional scope of practice.

Below you'll find details of a simple stretch that can be useful to help dissipate tigger points the biceps.

 

 

 

 

TECHNIQUE

Stand upright and clasp your hands together behind your back. Slowly lift your hands upward.

MUSCLES BEING STRETCHED

Primary muscle: Anterior deltoid.
Secondary muscles. Biceps brachii. Brachialis. Coracobrachialis.

INJURY WHERE STRETCH MAY BE USEFUL

Dislocation. Subluxation. Acromioclavicular separation. Sternoclavicular separation. Impingement syndrome. Rotator cuff tendonitis. Shoulder bursitis. Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis). Chest strain. Pectoral muscle insertion inflammation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR PERFORMING THIS STRETCH CORRECTLY

Do not lean forward while lifting your hands upward.

This webinar is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell.

 

 

NAT Trigger Point Therapy Certification

 

 

 

 


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