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Shoulder Arthritis - Self Help Options

Posted by Judith Winer on

As with other arthritic conditions, initial treatment of arthritis of the shoulder is nonsurgical.

Your doctor may recommend the following treatment options:

• Rest or change in activities to avoid provoking pain. You may need to change the way you move your arm to do things.

• Trigger point therapy is used effectively by many practitioners to help reduce pain and increase range of motion. There are specific NAT protocols that have been proven to be extremely effective.

• Exercises may improve the range of motion in your shoulder and provide some pain relief.

• Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as aspirin or ibuprofen, may reduce inflammation and pain. These medications can irritate the stomach lining and cause internal bleeding. They should be taken with food. Consult with your doctor before taking over-the-counter NSAIDs if you have a history of ulcers or are taking blood thinning medication. • Corticosteroid injections in the shoulder can dramatically reduce the inflammation and pain. However, the effect is often temporary.

• Moist heat

• Ice your shoulder for 20 to 30 minutes two or three times a day to reduce inflammation and ease pain.

• If you have rheumatoid arthritis, your doctor may prescribe a disease-modifying drug, such as methotrexate.

• Dietary supplements, such as glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate may help relieve pain. (Note: There is little scientific evidence to support the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate to treat arthritis. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.)










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