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Trigger Point Therapy - Hip Adductors

Posted by Judith Winer on

 

TECHNIQUE

Sit with the soles of your feet together and bring your feet towards your groin. Hold onto your ankles and push your knee towards the ground with your elbows. Keep your back straight and upright.

MUSCLES BEING STRETCHED

Primary muscles: Adductor longus, brevis, and magnus.
Secondary muscles: Gracilis. Pectineus.

INJURY WHERE STRETCH MAY BE USEFUL

Avulsion fracture in the pelvic area. Groin strain. Osteitis pubis. Piriformis syndrome. Tendonitis of the adductor muscles. Trochanteric bursitis.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR PERFORMING THIS STRETCH CORRECTLY

Keep your back straight and use your elbows to regulate the intensity of this stretch.

 

TRIGGER POINT SELF TREATMENT TECHNIQUE:

 

This technique involves locating the heart of the trigger/tender point. When this is compressed it may well trigger a specific referred pain map (preferably reproducing your symptoms). This technique involves applying direct, gentle and sustained pressure to the point:

1. Identify the tender/trigger point you wish to work on.

2. Place the host muscle in a comfortable position, where it is relaxed and can undergo full stretch.

3. Apply gentle, gradually increasing pressure to the tender point until you feel resistance. This should be experienced as discomfort and not as pain.

4. Apply sustained pressure until you feel the tender point yield and soften. This can take from a few seconds to several minutes.

5. Steps 3-4 can be repeated, gradually increasing the pressure on the tender/trigger point until it has fully yielded.

6. To achieve a better result, you can try to change the direction of pressure during these repetitions.

 

  

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This trigger point therapy blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

 

 

 

 


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